Once a Teacher, Always a Teacher

Linden “Lindy” Lentz

One of the blessings of teaching was working with other like-minded people who valued education and working with kids.  When I started teaching at Pine Hill School, little did I know that one other guy would be there as a fixture in the school throughout my thirty-one-year career.

When I first met Lindy Lentz during my student teaching year in 1984-1985, I wasn’t quite sure what to make of him as our styles were quite different.  Lindy wore a shirt and tie to school every day—something I tried to avoid (well, at least the tie 😎) at all costs.  He ran a tight ship while I was a little more laid back.  It took me the better part of a year to get to know him.  He was one of the most intelligent people I ever worked with but was never full of himself.  I’ve always found him to be a humble, down-to-earth guy, interested in many topics.

My first year of teaching. I’m the one who looks like he’s still in high school (top left) and Lindy is wearing his customary shirt and tie. (top right) This was our tiny school staff back in 1985-1986.

One thing was apparent right from the start—Lindy was an excellent teacher, always dedicated to his craft.  He never mailed it in.  Lindy taught for thirty-eight years and was just as committed in his last year as his first.  Whether he was teaching fourth grade, offering help as our computer lab/technology teacher, serving as the lead teacher during summer school, or teaching kindergarten, Lindy exemplified what it meant to be a professional.

Lindy in his student teaching year.

Lindy always created interesting units for his students.

Principal Cynthia Van Vleck (center) and Lindy (right). Cynthia was my master teacher and one of the finest principals we worked for.

A staff photo from Halloween. This year we dressed up as Wizard of Oz characters. That’s Lindy dressed at the tinman in the back row. Our staff always knew how to have a good time. Not only was it fun for the kids, but we enjoyed being silly with them for a day.

I know that I can’t possibly cover all of Lindy’s contributions to Pine Hill School during his career.  He always gave 100% to our school and the profession.  Lindy wrote grants, installed a kindergarten playground, got us up to speed in technology, prepared stimulating units and lessons, maintained his class website and school website, and assisted his fellow teachers.  As a young teacher still finding his way, Lindy was a good role model.  No one worked harder than him.    

All teachers have their particular interests and areas of expertise, and Lindy was no exception.  Perhaps the thing he was most passionate about was the use of technology as a vehicle to promote learning.  Lindy took a leadership role in this area by teaching after-school workshops and serving as a mentor teacher.  For several years, he took a small group of teachers to Technology Leadership Academy (TLA). That was a three-day/two-night workshop where teachers got to explore new technology that they could hopefully bring back and use at their school.  One year I was fortunate enough to accompany him.  It was fun for me to see him in this environment because he was the proverbial “kid in the candy store.”  Like a child on Christmas morning, his enthusiasm was catching.

Whenever I had a technology question, Lindy was my primary resource.  He always took the time to help his fellow staff members.  Instead of making me feel ignorant about asking for help, he was always patient.

One incredible act that speaks to Lindy’s generosity happened when my dad passed away in 2007.  I wanted to put a slide show together honoring his life, but I lacked the expertise or right frame of mind to try and pull this off in a short period.  I will be forever grateful to Lindy for helping me so that I was able to play it at my dad’s Celebration of Life.  He stayed after school two nights in a row late into the evening to help make this happen.  It was such a kind gesture of thoughtfulness—one I will never forget.  Knowing that my dad was a zoologist/biologist, Lindy went the extra mile by making copies of the CD and accompanying bird cover that I could give to my mom and each of my three older brothers.

DVD that Lindy helped me make for my Dad’s Celebration of Life. That’s my dad and his parents (my grandparents) on the DVD.
DVD case made by Lindy for my mom and brothers.

Lindy is a devoted family man.  He and his wife, Mary, will have been married 45 years in June.  They are the proud parents to three children (Kelly, Mike, and Kari) and two grandchildren (Anna and Violet).

Mary and Lindy on their wedding day. They will have been married 45 years in June.

Lindy and Mary do a lot of hiking these days in retirement.

Lindy with his three children (Mike, Kari, and Kelly).

Lindy with his grandchildren, Violet and Anna.

One of his grandchildren is fascinated with dinosaurs.  Like everything else Lindy undertakes, he goes all-in.  He wanted to further his granddaughter’s interest in dinosaurs, so he found a book that taught how to draw them. This was not just a cute project for him.  His granddaughter has learned her dinosaurs as demonstrated in the video below. As you can imagine, Lindy’s and Mary’s driveway has become quite a hit with the neighborhood children.  When it rains, guess who’s out there afterward drawing more dinosaurs?

Lindy drawing dinosaurs in the driveway to teach his grandchildren about them.
If you don’t think Lindy can teach his granddaughter about dinosaurs, think again.

Another inspiring feature of Lindy’s character is his volunteerism.  He is active in his church, where he maintains the church website and is a regular member of the Sacred Heart Parish.  When Covid happened, Lindy helped bring masses into people’s homes by video.

Lindy getting ready to film mass at Sacred Heart Parish.

When Lindy and I retired more than four years ago, we committed to taking care of ourselves through diet and exercise.  I’ve done pretty well, but his transformation is like nothing I’ve ever seen.  He has gone from a guy who limped through the school hallways with a bum knee to someone who now regularly does five-ten-mile hikes with Mary.  Talk about inspiring!  One of his latest pursuits is to go fossil hunting on these outings. Check out some of his great finds.

Some of Lindy’s fossil finds.

Not a bad day of fossil hunting.

Another interesting hobby that Lindy has is collecting books.  Collecting and reselling books became more than a hobby; it was supplemental income.  One of the most impressive stories about Lindy’s prowess in this area is that he was able to purchase his Tesla from his profits.  Not bad for a bit of treasure hunting.  Part of his attachment to his vehicle is all of the accompanying technology, but I also know he likes to give his friends a little thrill by showing its 0 to 60 mph speed. (I’m speaking from my white-knuckled experience as a passenger.)   

When not searching for rare books for himself, he provided low-cost books for the rest of the staff.  At least half of the books in my classroom library came from Lindy.  He regularly brought in books that he resold to other staff members for 25¢ each.

As far as other hobbies and interests, the list is too exhaustive to describe all of them.  Lindy loves making creative videos of his family and their experiences.  I’ll highlight two of his more recent ones. Because of Covid, Lindy and Mary hadn’t been able to see one of their grandkids for a year.  When the reunion finally took place, he made this video.

Precious time with his granddaughter.

When Mary and Lindy hike, he often tracks their treks by using this fantastic app so that others can see where they went and what they saw.

This is an app that Lindy uses to track his hikes with Mary. Notice it includes distance and elevation.

Another one of Lindy’s interests is local history.  It was a natural fit for him to become a member of the Humboldt Historical Society.  He also enjoys taking Jerry Rhode’s OLLI classes on local history.

Finally, Lindy is the kind of guy who continues to teach and help others.  I’ve been working on a children’s novel off and on for the past couple of years.  Besides meeting with my regular writing group, I’ve asked a few friends to read through my draft to provide much-needed feedback.  Lindy got so invested in my project that he has now read through my story three times. Each time he has made helpful suggestions that have helped me improve the overall quality.  I appreciate everything he has done for the community and me.  Once a teacher, always a teacher.

99 thoughts on “Once a Teacher, Always a Teacher

  1. Sounds like a wonderful guy, a great tribute to him!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 6, 2021 — 4:42 pm

      He was completely dedicated to his job and to his students. I learned a lot just by being around him.

      Like

  2. Marianne B Morse April 6, 2021 — 4:44 pm

    What a fine tribute, Pete! You’ve been blessed.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 6, 2021 — 5:24 pm

      I feel blessed to have worked with so many dedicated people who brought honor to the profession.

      Like

  3. What a satisfying life, Pete. Kudos.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 6, 2021 — 5:27 pm

      I don’t know if you ever found this when you were teaching, Jacqui, but one of the things we always used to say, “After the first day, it seems like we spent the rest of the year trying to catch up.”

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I think you wrote that in your book, didn’t you? I just finished it! Such memories.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Pete, what a terrific homage…and I really enjoyed it because it’s something he is here to see and enjoy as well…far too often, we forget to tell those we admire just how much and why we do…bravo to you for that!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. petespringerauthor April 6, 2021 — 5:32 pm

      Great point, John! Paying tribute to someone after they pass is comforting to the family, but why wait until then?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes, and that’s exactly what you did…terrific!

        Liked by 1 person

    2. Well said, John! My sentiments exactly.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. wow. what an amazing man, you are lucky to have known each other for so long – what a nice tribute to him, i hope he sees this

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 6, 2021 — 5:34 pm

      I’ve already sent it to his Facebook page. I’ve been poking around getting info from his wife to help me write this article. No secrets here! 🤣

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I was wondering how you managed to get hold of his wedding photo!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. petespringerauthor April 6, 2021 — 7:21 pm

        I sent some questions to his wife, Mary, to gather some facts that I didn’t know about. She also sent me a few photos, but I snatched the wedding photo off his Facebook page.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. The truth comes out!

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Oh, for the love of teaching and teacher mentors. So grateful for mine! This is a wonderful tribute to Lindy, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 6, 2021 — 5:38 pm

      I feel like sometimes our working environment doesn’t get enough attention. We do feed off of the positive energy and dedication of our colleagues.

      Liked by 2 people

  7. What a wonderful article on Lindy thanks

    Like

  8. petespringerauthor April 6, 2021 — 5:42 pm

    I forgot how small our staff was in those days, Norma. Look at us. 🤣

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  9. What a heartwarming tribute. Thank you for sharing this.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 6, 2021 — 7:04 pm

      I felt like it was a story that needed to be told. It was my pleasure to tell it because not everyone knows the many layers. I think some of my favorite parts now are seeing Lindy the grandparent.

      Like

  10. He’s a heck of a guy. He’s made a big positive difference in many people’s lives.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 6, 2021 — 7:07 pm

      That should be the goal and responsibility for all of us—to make our part of the world a better place.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. What a wonderful tribute Pete. How lucky were you to be mentored by him!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 6, 2021 — 7:09 pm

      The one thing I always say about educators is they look out for one another. We try to support the kids and each other.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. What an amazing human being! I feel honored just to get to read about him, so I can only imagine how you value your friendship. Thank you for sharing, Pete!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 6, 2021 — 7:19 pm

      We had a tight-knit staff. We still get together for lunch once a month in retirement. Like everything else, Covid interfered with that. Tomorrow is our first gathering in quite some time.

      Like

  13. I think you and Lindy are very fortunate to have each other as a friend.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 6, 2021 — 7:50 pm

      He’s a good man in a lot of ways. I neglected (not on purpose) to write about his support of other teachers regarding teacher issues. Lindy was a strong advocate of the teacher’s union and insisted that the district rightly follow our contract.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. It doesn’t surprise me to learn that Lindy was a strong teachers’ advocate.

        Liked by 1 person

  14. Pete, what a great profile of your friend and colleague. He sounds like quite a Renaissance man! You are lucky to have had such a good role model for a teaching colleague.
    Kent

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 6, 2021 — 9:23 pm

      He was more of a lead by example type, but he would be glad to assist if you ever asked for help. As you well know, it’s important to have teachers around that can help show us the ropes when we’re first starting out.

      Like

  15. What a wonderful tribute, thank you for introducing us to one of your great influencers! 🙂 also, wow you really did look like a high school student in your first year of teaching lol

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 6, 2021 — 9:19 pm

      I still remember the skeptical looks on the parents’ faces when they walked into my classroom that first year. “Is this guy even shaving yet?” 🤣🤣🤣

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Live Lindy is so wonderful and great teacher! I was a student in 3rd-6th grade and always looked forward to his special technology classes, whether is was watching something on Lazer discs or playing Lazer images to Christmas music. Years later our oldest daughter had him for kindergarten and we could see after a few months she was more open and talking in complete sentences! Such a wonderful teacher and I love how he is always enthusiastic about technology! I got to sit in his Tesla too before COVID.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 6, 2021 — 10:51 pm

      The best testimonials are from those who have been in the teacher’s class. I also think it speaks to the likelihood that you had a good experience if your daughter was also in his class.

      The G-force is such that I felt a little queasy afterward. It has a lot of get-up-and-go.

      Like

  17. A great tribute, every school should have a teacher and friend like that. Above and beyond the call of duty. Not many people have the enthusiasm and interest to create, improve and raise the standards of their work place or place of learning.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 7, 2021 — 8:17 am

      Well put, Janet! Attitude is everything. I know with my students, I always tried to remind myself to show appreciation for them being in my class. Is there a sadder feeling than when a child doesn’t feel loved by his/her parents? Heartbreaking!

      Liked by 1 person

  18. What a wonderful teacher and friend you are blessed, Pete as is Lindy 🙂 x

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 7, 2021 — 8:20 am

      As a teacher, there is a certain amount of just you and the kids, but the best working environments are ones where educators collaborate. Lindy and the rest of the kindergarten teachers were a perfect example of teammates working in concert.

      Liked by 1 person

  19. A nice tribute to someone who definitely made a lasting impression in your life.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 7, 2021 — 8:24 am

      I consider myself very lucky to have worked with some outstanding educators. It might sound overly dramatic, but I looked at each school day as a unique opportunity to change a child’s life.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Not dramatic to think of helping children get on the right path to adulthood.

        Liked by 1 person

  20. How wonderful for a student to have been taught by him! A lovely tribute, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 7, 2021 — 8:26 am

      Lindy may be retired (we left in the same year), but he is definitely still teaching. Going over my manuscript reminded me of a parent/teacher conference. This is what I think you’re doing well, and these are the things that need work or don’t make sense.

      Liked by 1 person

  21. What an amazing pair you are. Your school, including colleagues, students and parents, were so fortunate to have you. You are both inspiring, in what you did in school, and continue to do in retirement. I really enjoyed reading about Lindy and all his achievements. While I was reading it, I was reading just as much about you.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 7, 2021 — 8:29 am

      Thanks for your kind words, Norah. I like and follow various blogs, but I think we teachers tend to gravitate toward others in the profession because we know what it’s like in the trenches. Thanks for all you do for children, my friend.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I think many of our ‘trench’ experiences are similar, Pete. Thanks for all you do too. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  22. you made him come to life. you made me want to meet this fellow educator who puts the love of learning first in all he does. You can hear and feel your friendship.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 7, 2021 — 8:34 am

      I know as an educator you already know this, but I’m going to say it anyway. You are setting the foundation for the later years of learning for children. Kids like to learn, and by creating a nurturing environment, you’re setting the table for a lifetime of success.

      Liked by 1 person

  23. You have so many inspirational friends and colleagues! I love how appreciative you are of their presence in your life. Lindy sounds like a great guy. Oh, and I love the Relive app 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 7, 2021 — 8:39 am

      I’ve never tried that app, but it looks wonderful. I’m a bit of a geography nerd, so that adds to my enjoyment. I follow a couple of other bloggers (I may have mentioned this to you before) who basically live out of their van or motor home. They chart their expenses each month and share these with their followers. It is a fascinating lifestyle. I know it’s not for me, but I’m fascinated by it.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. On many occasions I enjoy other’s experiences without having to do it myself 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  24. What a fantastic tribute! You’ve both been blessed by your friendship.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 7, 2021 — 2:58 pm

      I only knew Lindy in the teacher’s role for many years, so it’s been cool to see him as a grandpa. He does have special expertise and fondness for technology.

      Liked by 1 person

  25. Sounds like an all-around great guy and super teacher. I enjoy reading about people like him.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 7, 2021 — 3:01 pm

      A good teacher can teach just about any age. Sometimes people get pigeonholed into thinking they only can do one thing well. When I first heard that Lindy was going to teach kindergarten, I was shocked, but he proved that he could do that well also.

      Liked by 1 person

  26. A very fascinating story about a fellow teacher, Pete. Thanks for sharing Lindy’s.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 7, 2021 — 3:03 pm

      Lindy is one of those guys who is always doing for others, so it felt good to send some appreciation his way.

      Liked by 1 person

  27. A great biographical tribute to your fellow teacher, Pete!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 7, 2021 — 3:04 pm

      It’s one thing to teach for thirty-eight years, but an entirely different matter to do it well for so long.

      Like

      1. You got that right!

        Liked by 1 person

  28. You caused me to reminisce about the wonderful artists I taught with. Each teacher brings an individuality to the classroom, a real bonus for students. Lindy in tie, you in tie-dye(or the like!) I wore heels and dresses many years surrounded by paint spattered faculty. It was fun to see that each of us was a separate person. I loved this tribute and even though I never met him I felt that I got to know him a little bit.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 7, 2021 — 3:08 pm

      One of the magical parts of teaching is there isn’t one specific formula for all. My master teacher gave me some great advice during my student teaching year to not model her but develop my own style. I’m guessing that art teachers have specific areas that they are skilled in. How nice to be able to learn something from each one.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. They also had very different approaches to teaching. I loved the distinctions between the very supportive and the very critical, both helpful for budding artists.

        Liked by 1 person

  29. wow – Lindy sounds like an amazing guy. How lucky you are to call him your friend. I loved the story of how he helped you with the cd when your dad passed away. I also love his dinosaur drawings, and I can’t wait for full motion picture release of his day at the beach with his granddaughter.

    I’m glad Lindy pursued a career in education; I am sure he has inspired thousands of people over th years…

    great tribute, Pete!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 7, 2021 — 9:37 pm

      I’m having a good time remembering some of the great people I worked with. Pretty much whatever Lindy sinks his teeth into, he does well. He has made a bunch of those little movies, and they’re creative each time.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. It’s nice to see him put his creative skills to good use…

        Liked by 1 person

  30. Wow! What a friend! What a man and a teacher and a grandfather and parent. I think this kind of profile of a teacher should be done once a year in every elementary, middle, and high school. We parents don’t get to know much about the teachers of our children and we should! Having a daughter as a middle school science teacher I know how much work she does but not too many people outside of our household understand the amount of commitment and love it takes to be a good teacher. You show all of that through your words here about wonderful Lindy.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 8, 2021 — 12:24 pm

      We, teachers, don’t go quietly. I think that’s part of my story too. I retired three years before I planned to due to some health issues. I feel like I’ve still got more to give. It’s the main reason I’ve decided that my best path forward now is to write books for kids. My first MG/YA (best described as a tweener) novel is being edited right now. I don’t talk much about it because I’m in this time for the long haul. I’m respecting the process and still learning a lot. If I can’t land an agent in the next year, then I’ll probably self-publish. I enjoy learning, and that alone makes this endeavor worthwhile.

      Schools around here have resumed in-school attendance. Is your daughter teaching remotely, in-school, or a combination? Most people have no idea of all the extra hours teachers put in. They think they understand, but they really don’t. I’ll bet your daughter is a great teacher who is changing lives.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. First, I sure hope your health issues are resolved. You LOOK mighty healthy! Second, yes, writing and publishing are for the long haul. I had an agent here and there, but the time the entire process takes is too long for me. At my age, I want to share my fiction and non-fiction/life’s perspective before I’m gone. That’s what’s great about Indie publishing IF we still take our time with beta readers/editors/cover designers, etc. Lastly, my daughter has been teaching hybrid all school year, so has one set of students M/T, another set Th/F, but is also Zooming with the ‘at home’ kids all at the same time. Craziness. And yes, she stays in contact (as you do) with former students and gets wonderful feedback. Lots of female scientists out there, I think, because of my daughter’s 6th grade Science class. (Whoops, I think I’m bragging…)

        Liked by 1 person

      2. petespringerauthor April 9, 2021 — 8:09 am

        Brag away—it’s one of the perks of being a parent. The former students following in your daughter’s footsteps brings a huge smile t my face. That has to be the best feeling for her. Hopefully, we’re past those old stereotypical notions that girls shouldn’t be scientists.

        I have a feeling that I’ll tire of waiting, but I have to find out. They’re already getting the extended warranty with people like us, Pam. 😂

        Liked by 1 person

  31. Lindy sounds like a wonderful teacher, colleague, and friend. Teaching is a passion and not everyone can do it. I am able to teach my sons and spend a lot of time with Michael ensuring he gets good marks at school, but I am [apparently] not good at instructing my colleagues at work. I can’t simplify things enough for them to understand. I’ve had this feedback many times over the years despite my greatest efforts to start from scratch.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 8, 2021 — 10:19 pm

      I often heard the opposite from parents. They often told me they had a hard time teaching their child. Not because their children weren’t smart, but because sometimes a child gave a parent more grief than they would their teachers. One of the comments I’d sometimes hear from parents at parent/teacher conferences was, “Can you talk to him? He’ll listen to you.”

      Liked by 1 person

      1. That is interesting, Pete. My son, Michael, would never do his homework with the au pair or even with my mother. He waited for me and I had to do it with him. I don’t mind but it was as strange thing. I remember him running away from one au pair to escape the homework but he was as good as gold with me. We do have a tutor for maths and Afrikaans now but he still insists I help him study, even the Afrikaans which is a bit of a struggle for me.

        Liked by 1 person

  32. What a wonderful tribute to a fine man. Thank goodness there are teachers (and people) like Lindy in this world. You were blessed to work alongside him for many years. I love the photos! Comparing the two of you in your first year was something else. Who were you dressed as in The Wizard of Oz?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 10, 2021 — 7:23 am

      He’s got a big heart and is always willing to help someone who needs it. I am just to the left of him. I’m supposed to be the cowardly lion. Dressing up each year around a common theme was one of the things our staff always did. I think my favorite was when we came dressed as school supplies. I was a giant box of tissue while others were pencils, erasers scissors, glue, etc.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I can tell it’s you in the photo. 🙂 Dressing up each year is so great for the kids. Clearly you had a principal who “got it”. I know you have written about her before. What a wonderful school. You were lucky to be there, Pete.

        Liked by 1 person

  33. Pete, it was such a delight to see all these photos. Coincidently, just a few minutes ago I was thinking about my (rather short) stent as a substitute teacher, many years ago. Hugs on the wing!

    Like

    1. petespringerauthor April 10, 2021 — 8:27 am

      I never was a substitute teacher, but there were several things I saw that would make it a pretty undesirable job:
      1. You don’t know the kids well and any associated problems they may have. It’s tough supervising children you don’t have a relationship with.
      2. The pay was pitiful. I’ve seen people compare the pay per hour to have children in a daycare, and it’s pretty startling. One year our contract said that we could have only “x” amount of kids in our class. There was a clause that said the district reserved the right to place other children in your class at the rate of pay of $3 per day for one extra child or $5 per day for two extra children. In retrospect, I can’t believe we agreed to that.
      3. Teachers leave a variety of lesson plans from way too much information (that was me) to nothing and all degrees of in-between. I never understood how anyone could leave no plan, but that happened at times.

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  34. What a wonderful, extensive tribute to Lindy, Pete! I can’t believe how people like him find the time to combine all those fantastic pursuits. I remember, as a teacher, to be exhausted by the summer vacation. To then teach summer school… Or to add extra curriculum to an already busy week by mentoring or focusing on technology improvements, website updates, etc. What a guy! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 11, 2021 — 8:29 am

      An image of a rat on a wheel comes to mind. The harder you work, that wheel keeps turning in the teaching world. I’m sure you remember that feeling of “one more thing.”

      Liked by 1 person

  35. What an inspiration, Pete. I loved this article – I can see from that video about dinosaurs on the driveway what a fantastic teacher he is as well as a grandad. And I recognised you straight away in that youthful photo!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 12, 2021 — 8:18 am

      It’s priceless to see him enjoying his grandkids. His wife, Mary, told me Lindy often gives fossils to the people they meet along the way. Of course, they’ll get a little lesson with their fossil. I have few regrets in life, but wouldn’t it be fun to be able to go back to our younger selves once in a while?

      Liked by 1 person

  36. Wow, there is a lot to love about Lindy! I can tell from the photos and what you wrote that he gave 100% when he was colleague to those around him and that he continues to do so. We need more people in the world like him! I love the throwback photos too. I was touched by how he helped you with your dad’s Celebration of Life. What a special man.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 18, 2021 — 5:06 pm

      We don’t get to choose the people we work with in most jobs. In that respect, I’ve been fortunate. I consider several of my former coworkers to be some of the finest people I know.

      Lindy was such a dedicated teacher. He made quite a time sacrifice to help me with the video. It was a gesture I will never forget.

      Liked by 1 person

  37. I got sidetracked when I saw your post and didn’t read it until this evening. I just found out you and I started teaching in the same year – 1985. It was when there was a shortage of bilingual teachers, and LAUSD had a Joint Venture program with Cal State U. Teachers could start teaching and did student teaching at the same time. Cal State had a supervisor who came to the school to meet with me and observe me three times per semester.

    Lindy was a dedicated teacher, and yes, once a teacher, always a teacher. He did his teaching plus leadership. It was great. I was a mentor teacher for three years. He did a great job drawing the dinosaurs and wow, the granddaughter knew all the names! It was wonderful he helped you out to make the DVD in remembrance of your dad.

    It’s great that you teamed up with him to stay in shape. It always helps to cheer up each other. Thank you for sharing about Lindy. This is an inspirational post, Pete! I just ordered the Tina paperback and will receive them in 10 days. I have your address and will send you a signed copy. Your help is greatly appreciated.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 19, 2021 — 7:48 pm

      Thanks for your wonderful comments, Miriam. I’m looking forward to getting my copy, but I couldn’t wait. I already bought the Kindle version last night.😎 You know I have to support my writing friends. I’m just setting down to work on your post for tomorrow. I’ll probably post it at midnight tonight.

      We’re flying out to Montana in about two and a half weeks to see our son. We’ll be there for Mother’s Day, which will mean a lot to my wife.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I’ll wait for your post because I’ll link your post on my blog in additional to seeing your post. Thank you for purchasing the Kindle version.
        Good to hear you’re going to see your son. It would be wonderful for your wife to be there for Mother’s Day.

        Liked by 1 person

  38. You’re so kind to feature some of the wonderful people in your life, Pete. Lindy sounds like a great teacher and friend, and it’s clear that he continues to be both. I love the dinosaur drawings! Lol. What fun. Congrats to you both for staying active and keeping on touch. Enjoy!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 25, 2021 — 8:58 am

      I do enjoy writing about people. We don’t usually get to choose the people we work with, but did I ever get lucky, starting with my master teacher. Lindy and I were the only males in our school for a long time.

      Liked by 1 person

  39. Oh I enjoyed reading this! Your Lindy reminds me of the lovely lady who taught me more about teaching in three weeks than I learned in my entire Graduate Diploma year. I can’t remember her name -hits head on keyboard- but she was a tiny woman and about six months pregnant when she became the supervisor for my first teaching round [over here we have to get hands on experience for a number of weeks before we’re allowed loose in a classroom].
    What I learned was that discipline is not a dirty word when it’s applied with kindness, consistency and /respect/. Her/our classroom consisted of a lot of underprivileged kids, many of whom did not speak English as a first language. Yet they all tried their hearts out…for /her/. They loved her because she never, ever made them feel bad about themselves. Behaving respectfully to others was the natural result of being treated with respect themselves. I not only benefited from being her shadow, I learned a vital lesson that stood me in good stead for years thereafter.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. petespringerauthor April 27, 2021 — 9:08 pm

      Thanks for sharing that story. That was exactly my philosophy. What made me want to beat my head against the keyboard was when an administrator was harping about raising test scores when students come to school underfed or underclothed with “role models” who couldn’t manage their own lives, let alone their child’s. I understood the administrator was just doing his/her job, but let’s focus on what really matters—kids who are happy, loved, and safe at school.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. ‘let’s focus on what really matters—kids who are happy, loved, and safe at school.’ Yes!!!!!!

        Liked by 1 person

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